Kitchen Science

I have always thought it would be amazing to center a chemistry class completely around what happens in the kitchen.  After all, every time a person bakes or cooks, they performing several different science experiments at once.  Combining ingredients in a specific way (stoichiometry, reactions, kinetics), watching things rise and fall (gas laws), learning the heartbreak of failure (all science all the time).  Okay, I am hopefully just kidding about the last one, but I mean, it is all there.  That is why I was so excited when I came across this article from NatGeo that provides an amazing example of doing just this with kids!  Let kids play with the ingredients of cookies.

I would actually take this experiment even a step further.  Have your kiddo keep notes on what they are adding.  Let them track the height and width of the cookie.  Let them write down observations of taste of the batter (if you are willing) and the end product.  This is a really nice summer activity.  Full disclosure: I could see this taking a long time, especially if the kids are really young (think 3rd grade and below).  However, this is an amazing way to let kids keep thinking about the science that they know and really letting them apply the scientific method.

And as a quick aside, I will remind you of my last post that talked about the amount of knowledge lost over the summer breaks.  This activity can also help students keep their math skills sharp!  Double Win!!

I will also write up a shorter version of this and provide a lab notebook page on our website (I will link it a little later) if you want your child to be able to take some notes while going through this.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/people-and-culture/food/the-plate/2015/01/09/experimental-cookie-science/